How to Solve Problems Using the Six Thinking Hats Method

Stanley Arnold

Every problem contains within itself the seeds of its own solution.


Does Every Problem Serve a Purpose?

When life unexpectedly throws you a curve ball, things can get overwhelming and ridiculously frustrating very quickly.

If you’re unable to deal with these challenges, this puts you at a clear disadvantage and sabotages your growth and development. And, this is precisely where most people struggle. They’re just ill-prepared for the adversity that life throws their way.

However, irrespective of the problems you face, your issues do actually serve a purpose. That purpose might not be immediately evident, but it’s certainly there.

Every problem you experience has a purpose. That purpose can come in the form of an opportunity. For instance, an opportunity for growth, for improving efficiency, for learning from a mistake, for expanding your perspective, etc.

Problems are typically opportunities that can help improve how you think about your life, yourself, and about your circumstances. They can serve to optimize how you work and live in remarkable ways. However, you need to first embrace these problems with an open heart and mind.

It has been said, that it’s not what happens to us that matters, it’s rather how we respond to what happens that makes all the difference.

Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats method will help you handle adversity, setbacks, and obstacles in far more optimal ways. It presents an efficient method for problem-solving that can be used individually or in a team environment.

This particular interpretation of the Six Thinking Hats is specifically targeted toward individuals who deal with daily challenges in their business, career, and life.

Therefore, if you’re currently struggling with an array of problems, then the Six Thinking Hats method can become an excellent source of inspiration. It can help guide you through these problems in more optimal ways.


To explore additional articles in this series, please click through on the links below:

• Part 1: Strategic Questions
• Part 2: Creative Thinking
• Part 3: Problem Solving
• Part 4: Critical Thinking
• Part 5: Six Thinking Hats


The Managerial Blue Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver has to have a method for directing their thoughts in proactive ways. Moreover, they must understand how to guide each of their thoughts in a neutral and unbiased manner with the primary intention of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the process.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the Blue Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a blue hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that can help you to think through your problems in rational ways.

The Role of the Blue Hat

The metaphorical role of the blue hat is the Movie Director.

A movie director manages actors, cameramen, shooting angles, props, and scripts that are critical for creating a successful blockbuster movie experience.

In precisely the same way, a blue hat manages the thinking process — allowing for better synergy between the thought patterns and habits of the other thinking hats.

Here is a breakdown of the roles the blue hat typically plays:

  • To think about thinking.
  • To define the problem.
  • To gather global perspectives about the problem and the solution.
  • To manage the other thinking hats.
  • To manage time.
  • To manage the flow of ideas.
  • To manage the implementation of ideas.

The primary role of the blue hat is to think about the process of thinking.

Every thought that it has is focused on improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the thinking process. This subsequently filters through to the other five hats.

The smoother, faster, and more efficient the process, the higher the probability that a practical solution can be found.

The blue hat must, however, clearly describe the problem in writing. If it fails to define the problem clearly, then it will waste precious time directing its energies on irrelevant thoughts, activities, and tasks.

It’s important to note though, that the blue hat is detached from the actual problem. It prefers to sit back and play the role of the court judge who oversees events from a global perspective. It then uses these insights to decide on a suitable plan of action.

Another role that the blue hat plays is that of a manager. In this role, the blue hat helps to improve the flow of communication between all the hats, thereby encouraging better insights and ideas that bring about ideal solutions to the problem at hand.

The blue hat understands the importance of time and how critical it is for problem-solving. With this in mind, the blue hat plays the role of the timekeeper. It allocates precise chunks of time to the other hats and to specific topics under discussion.

The blue hat is well aware that time should be spent wisely on areas that will bring about the highest returns on investment.

The blue hat also manages the flow of ideas between the hats. It attempts to piece together all the scattered thoughts to help generate an ideal solution to the problem.

Each thinking hat has a unique set of ideas, approaches, and perspectives. The blue hat must constructively merge these unique thoughts, otherwise, the thought process will stumble and stagnate in the face of adversity.

Unique and creative ideas are, of course, wonderful. However, unless we find a means of integrating them into our physical reality, then we will, unfortunately, fail to grasp the opportunities they present us with. For this very reason, the blue hat’s final role is to manage the implementation of these ideas.

The Objectives of the Blue Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the blue hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Improving efficiency and effectiveness of the thinking process.
  • Formulating suitable questions to help direct thinking.
  • Outlining an agenda, rules, goals, and tasks for problem-solving.
  • Organizing ideas and drawing up plans for action.

The blue hat’s primary objective is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the thinking process. The better it’s able to manage the “thinking” of the other hats, the more readily it can identify key ideas and insights needed to expedite the problem-solving process.

The blue hat understands that asking the right kinds of questions can generate helpful insights and potential solutions. However, it must ask these questions cautiously.

The blue hat must pose questions that help stimulate the thinking process. However, it must do so in a way that minimizes the personal biases and limitations that each hat brings to the table.

The blue hat initiates this process by setting an agenda, by outlining rules for discussion, and by setting tasks and objectives that continuously drive the thinking process forward.

The blue hat’s final objective is to then collate all the ideas, facts, and opinions brought forward by the other thinking hats. It then uses that information to structure a practical plan of action for solving the problem.

The more thoroughly it’s able to piece together these dispersed thoughts and ideas, the more ammunition it has to bring its plans to fruition.

Blue Hat - Six Thinking Hats

Blue Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a blue hat’s perspective:

What problem am I facing?

How can I best define this problem?

What is my goal and outcome?

What do I seek to achieve by solving this problem?

What is the most effective method of proceeding from this position?

How can I best organize and arrange my thinking to help move me beyond my present circumstances?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a blue hat thinker.


The Neutral White Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver needs a means of collecting, collating, organizing, and presenting information in a neutral and unbiased way. Moreover, they must have a method for reaching effective logical solutions based on the data they have collected.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the White Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a white hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that can help you to think through your problems in objective ways.

The Role of the White Hat

The metaphorical role of the white hat is The Detective.

A detective searches for clues, for evidence, and for facts that help them solve a case. They openly acknowledge that a piece of evidence can be misleading. They, therefore, maintain a neutral stance and don’t jump to quick conclusions. They, instead wait for all the facts to be presented before reaching a conclusion.

In precisely the same way, a white hat collects facts, stats, and data that help it piece together the information it needs to reach logical fact-based solutions. That’s essentially its primary role. It collects this evidence to help the other thinking hats work through the problem more effectively.

The white hat must, however, avoid making conclusions or judgments about the information it has collected. Jumping to conclusions or making unjustified assumption could potentially derail the problem-solving process.

The Objectives of the White Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the white hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Bringing forward stats, facts, and data that can be used to solve the problem.
  • Prioritizing facts over opinions and beliefs.
  • Highlighting gaps in knowledge, perspective, and awareness.
  • Bringing forth logical solutions to the problem at hand.

The white hat’s primary objective is to collect and collate relevant facts, stats, information and data about the problem. This is designed to help open new avenues for brainstorming possible solutions.

These facts are based on questions that address the what, when, where, and how of problem-solving.

In the realm of white hat thinking, there are no beliefs or opinions, there are just solid concrete facts and evidence. These facts, therefore, take precedence over everything else.

Through its exposition of key facts and data, the white hat goes to work unlocking valuable titbits of information about the problem. Its key objective is to bring forth a set of logical, but neutral solutions that will help stimulate further thinking and exploration.

All this, of course, sets the foundations for the reflective thinking that is about to take place.

White Hat - Six Thinking Hats

White Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a white hat’s perspective:

What do I know about this problem?

What don’t I know about this problem?

What can I learn from this problem?

What more would I like to learn about this problem?

How will I go about acquiring the facts, stats and data that will help me resolve this problem?

What potential solutions exist based on the facts, stats, and data I have collected?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a white hat thinker.


The Intuitive Red Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver needs a means of intuitively making sense of each problem and the possible solutions that could arise. Moreover, they must have a method for adequately filtering out any preconceived biases that may sway their intuitive feelings and opinions.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the Red Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a red hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that can help you to think through your problems in intuitive ways.

The Role of the Red Hat

The metaphorical role of the red hat is The Heart.

A heart is a very intuitive organ that senses subtle changes in feeling and emotion when circumstances change.

In precisely the same way, a red hat brings to light its intuitive feelings and opinions to help guide the problem-solving process. That’s essentially its primary role. It intuitively presents effective solutions and direction for further action based on its personal feelings and hunches.

The red hat must, however, avoid rationalizing or trying to justify its feelings. There is no logic here. It must primarily follow its gut instinct.

The Objectives of the Red Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the red hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Bringing to light intuitive insights.
  • Seeking out other people’s feelings and hunches.
  • Exploring the emotional point of view.
  • Revealing hidden strengths behind ideas.
  • Identifying weaknesses based on hunches.
  • Uncovering hidden internal conflicts.

The red hat’s primary objective is to intuitively bring to mind proposals and plans for action that are based on its personal feelings and hunches.

Our feelings are very interesting and somewhat mysterious chemical processes that stimulate mental activity in the brain. When they are pure and removed from personal emotion and bias, they can lead us in unexpected directions towards solutions we logically would never have considered.

The red hat is very open-minded and seeks to identify and clarify other people’s feelings. They then intuitively relate that back to the problem at hand.

They fully understand that when someone is completely removed from the problem, that they’re likely to bring to mind ideas and insights that would frequently cloud their judgment. The red hat can, however, be swayed by their emotional tendencies.

They often seek an emotional understanding of the problem, and, therefore, bring to mind solutions based on their unconscious emotional tendencies.

It’s, of course, particularly important for the other thinking hats to recognize this, as it could unveil certain personal biases, hidden emotions, and reactions that may effectively sabotage the problem-solving process. However, when the red hat is in-tune with their feelings, that is when they truly shine.

For instance, sometimes ideas and potential solutions to problems may seem weak and somewhat impractical at first. However, if the red hat intuitively brings to mind a plan that it feels should be pursued, then this naturally should open the door to further discussion and an exploration of opportunities.

By giving this new idea its deserved attention, you are now expanding possibilities that you may never have considered before.

The red hat’s intuitive feelings may also be used to uncover hidden weaknesses in ideas. This is particularly evident when the solutions we have in mind aren’t as clearcut as they seem. In such instances, contingency plans may need to be set in place just in case things don’t go to plan.

Another essential point to consider is that the red hat’s intuitive feelings may, in fact, bring to mind personal weaknesses or gaps in skill and knowledge. These gaps may need to be addressed to solve the problem under question.

For instance, if the red hat’s feelings are in conflict with the current solution that’s on the table, then this could very well indicate that you don’t have enough resources, skills, knowledge, or experience to make the most of this proposed solution.

The red hat is, however, no shaman or prophet. Its natural tendencies and decisions may, therefore, indirectly reveal subtle internal conflicts that boil up within its psyche. These conflicts can affect the red hat’s hunches and could essentially lead to biased feedback that may sabotage the problem-solving process.

It’s, of course, of primary importance that the blue hat spots these tendencies. It must bring these conflicts to the surface before a final decision is reached.

Red Hat - Six Thinking Hats

Red Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a red hat’s perspective:

What is my gut telling me about this solution?

What are my feelings telling me about the choice I am about to make?

Based on my feelings, is there a better way to go about this?

Intuitively, is this the right solution to this problem?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a red hat thinker.


The Pessimistic Black Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver needs a means of proactively identifying the pitfalls, dangers, and flaws of possible solutions. Moreover, they must have a method of presenting this information in an unemotional and detached manner that isn’t riddled with preconceived ideas or biases.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the Black Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a black hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that can help you to think through your problems more critically and realistically.

The Role of the Black Hat

The metaphorical role of the black hat is The Reaper.

A Reaper is a mythical creature who brings death and destruction to the living. The Reaper isn’t necessarily good or evil. Yes, its nature is dark and gloomy, however, as with everything in life, it has a purpose and plays a critical role in the cycle of life.

In precisely the same way a black hat is pessimistic and gloomy in nature. It always seeking to pinpoint holes, flaws, weaknesses, and dangers in ideas. It doesn’t do this to be spiteful or destructive, but rather to bring to mind worst-case scenarios that may not have been considered.

Sharing these grim scenarios helps the other hats put in place suitable contingency plans to overcome likely problems.

The black hat’s primary role is to evaluate, judge, caution, and scrutinize the solutions and plans that have been brought forth by the other thinking hats.

The black hat must, however, avoid bringing to mind personal biases that are tinged with fear, jealousy, anger or any other harmful emotions that may impede a solution or magnify the problem.

The Objectives of the Black Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the black hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Bringing to light possible flaws and dangers.
  • Highlighting inadequate resources.
  • Eliminating weaknesses and bad ideas.
  • Questioning inadequate contingency plans.

The black hat’s primary objective is to expose all the possible flaws and dangers that could derail the goals you are seeking to achieve.

Every solution you come up with may seem wonderful on the surface. However, below the surface, it could be riddled with dangers.

The black hat excels at finding fatal flaws in potential plans and solutions before you jump headfirst into a pool filled with hungry sharks.

The black hat, however, doesn’t just poke holes in ideas. It will also bring to mind the various resources that you will likely need to accomplish your objective. These resources could include skills, knowledge, support, and time.

If the solution you are aiming for requires key resources you are sorely lacking, then the black hat will make you aware of these inadequacies.

The black hat’s primary indirect objective is to eliminate all weaknesses and ill-thought-through ideas. It does this indirectly through it’s pessimistic and critical nature.

Once these weaknesses have been brought to light, that is when the yellow hat takes over. The yellow hat’s primary objective is to overcome these weaknesses using a logical sequence of steps.

The black hat’s final objective is to bring to mind inadequate contingency plans that may seem fool-proof on the surface. As a result, the black hat persistently asks itself:

How is this likely to fail?

The answers to this question set the course for inspired yellow and green hat thinking.

Black Hat - Six Thinking Hats

Black Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a black hat’s perspective:

What is the fatal flaw in this idea?

What is the drawback to this way of thinking?

How many ways is this likely to fail?

What are the potential risks and consequences associated with this?

Do I have the necessary resources, skills, and support to pull this off?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a black hat thinker.


The Optimistic Yellow Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver needs a means of realistically analyzing problems and bringing to light promising ideas that can help inspire effective solutions. Moreover, they need to cultivate a resilient mindset that inspires proactive action in the face of criticism and adversity.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the Yellow Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a yellow hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that will encourage you to think through your problems more optimistically and favorably.

The Role of the Yellow Hat

The metaphorical role of the yellow hat is The Sun.

A sun is bright, happy, and powerful. It helps give life to everything it touches.

In exactly the same way, a yellow hat brings forth a positive, welcoming, and radiant energy that breathes life into every idea.

The yellow hat seeks to infuse positive ideas into the problem-solving process that enhances motivation and opens doors to new opportunities and understandings.

The primary role of the yellow hat is to move through the myriad of obstacles to a solution in a realistic and positive way. 

The yellow hat sees no boundaries or limitations and wholeheartedly believes that if there is a means, then they will find a way.

The yellow hat must, however, avoid getting caught up in pessimistic thoughts. They must also avoid bringing to mind hopeful solutions based on hypothetical facts, feelings, and opinions.

The Objectives of the Yellow Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the yellow hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Exploring benefits of each scenario that is presented.
  • Seeking out potential opportunities that might exist.
  • Making a positive risk-assessment.
  • Assessing the feasibility of ideas.
  • Infusing the problem-solving process with positive energy.

The yellow hat persistently seeks out benefits. It sees a problem and brings to mind effective contingency plans and solutions that help pave the way forward. Its primary objective is to search for answers that lead to a higher array of opportunities.

It wholeheartedly understands that within every problem there is an equivalent seed of opportunity that is waiting to be discovered.

The yellow hat, of course, recognizes that there are risks associated with every action that’s aimed at a solution to the problem. It, therefore, realistically assesses these risks and draws up a practical plan that counteracts, minimizes, and eliminates them.

Another primary objective of the yellow hat is to assess the feasibility of ideas based on the resources (skills, knowledge, time, and support) you have available.

It takes these resources into consideration and formulates ideas and plans that make the best use of the resources you have at your disposal while minimizing the effect of what you’re missing.

The final objective of the yellow hat is to instill a sense of positive expectation that moves the problem-solving process forward. It, therefore, tackles every challenge with optimism, patience, determination, and resolve.

Yellow Hat - Six Thinking Hats

Yellow Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a yellow hat’s perspective:

How can I best approach this problem?

How can I logically and realistically make this work?

What positive outcomes could result from this action?

What are the long-term benefits of this action?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a yellow hat thinker.


The Creative Green Hat Thinker

An effective problem solver needs a means of processing problems in an open, flexible, and unconstrained way. Moreover, they must become a possibility thinker who persistently thinks outside the box and bends the rules of problem-solving. Furthermore, they must do this free from judgment and self-criticism.

In this section, let’s discuss each of the characteristics and attributes that give birth to the Green Thinking Hat. Let’s delve into the roles, goals, and objectives of a green hat thinker. We will then conclude with a set of questions that will encourage you to think through your problems in creative ways.

The Role of the Green Hat

The metaphorical role of the green hat is The Seedling.

A seedling sprouts from the ground and grows persistently over time. It expands its leaves and branches in many unexpected directions.

In exactly the same way, a green hat instills an ever-growing and expanding sense of unpredictability into the thought process.

The green hat isn’t one to be controlled by rules or limitations. It knows and understands that it’s free to think beyond the norms and boundaries of reality. With this in mind, it brings forth a myriad of creative and mind-bending ideas that expand the possibilities and bring to light unique and seemingly unexpected solutions.

The primary role of the green hat is to open the doors to unique creative ideas and perspectives that shatter the boundaries of reality and unlock new understandings and opportunities.

The green hat must, however, avoid criticizing or judging the ideas that it brings to mind.

The Objectives of the Green Hat

Throughout the problem-solving process, the green hat has a set of predefined objectives that it seeks to accomplish. By successfully attaining these goals, it’s better able to synchronize its habitual thought patterns with the other thinking hats.

This subsequently leads to a more efficient and effective process of thinking that brings to light a greater array of solutions and opportunities. These objectives include:

  • Expanding thinking and awareness of ideas and potential solutions.
  • Thinking outside the box and bending conventional rules and practices.
  • Providing creative ideas and solutions.
  • Installing new perspectives through creative insights and ideas.

The primary role of the green hat is to expand the possibilities of reality in surprising and unexpected ways beyond box-like thinking methods.

It seeks out new strategies, tactics, and methods for thinking about problems then twists them in multi-dimensional ways that lead to new insights, answers, and understandings.

The green hat isn’t constrained by standard rules of thinking about a problem. It understands that rules are made to be broken. And so, it completely disregards all rules and guidelines. Instead, it’s always thinking, expanding, analyzing, daydreaming, and manifesting crazy and wacky ideas that sometimes make no logical sense.

It’s not the green hat’s duty to live in the logical world. This is what the other hats do very well. Its responsibility is rather within the realm of fantasy  — within free-flowing lateral thinking that breaks the boundaries of reality. And it’s this method of thinking that brings to light improbable ideas and wacky solutions.

The green hat uses numerous creative problem-solving techniques that help to expand its awareness and understanding of the problem. These methods bring to mind unique ideas and solutions that challenge the other thinking hats to think in original ways.

The green hat’s process of thinking presents the other hats with new perspectives and modes of looking at the problem (and its possible solutions). This successfully breaks down the boundaries of understanding and opens the doors to new solutions.

Green Hat - Six Thinking Hats

Green Hat Questions

Here is a list of questions that will help you think more effectively about your problems from a green hat’s perspective:

What alternative possibilities could exist here?

Could this be done in a different way?

How can I look at this problem from a unique perspective?

How can I think outside the box about this?

What if…?

Keep in mind that this list of questions is only a starting point that will help guide you in the right direction. Additional questions that you formulate by yourself should take into account each of the roles and objectives that are critical to the mindset of a green hat thinker.


How to Use the Six Thinking Hats

Now that you have a solid understanding of the Six Thinking Hat’s problem-solving process, it’s time to briefly point out how these hats work together to help you formulate effective solutions and new ideas.

Okay, so, the process begins when the managerial blue hat (Director) allocates thinking time to each of the six hats, including itself. Often the order of thinking would progress in the following way:

  1. The blue hat defines and outlines the problem under question. It then guides the other thinking hats through the thinking process.
  2. The white hat collects all the facts, data, and statistics related to the problem. It then uses this information to settle on several logical solutions to the problem.
  3. The red hat intuitively reflects on the solutions. Then, based on its hunches, it selects the best course of action moving forward.
  4. The black hat quickly pinpointing holes, dangers, flaws, and limitations of the proposed plans.
  5. The yellow hat now challenges the black hat’s pessimism by bringing to light logical ideas and contingency plans that help circumnavigate these dangers.
  6. The green hat then takes these ideas and enhances them using its out-of-the-box thinking mentality.
  7. After all the thinking hats have had their say, the blue hat continues to transition between the hats in a logical order. It may, for instance, ask the red hat for its intuitive insights about the green hat’s ideas. Or, it may ask the white hat to gather more facts and information about the dangers that the black hat brought to light. After which, it may ask the yellow hat to bring forth some logical solutions to the problem at hand.

No matter how the blue hat decides to orchestrate the thinking process, it’s always seeking to obtain a global perspective and understanding of the problem. Its objective is to bring to light an ideal solution to the problem.

Staying presently aware of this objective will help you cycle through the Six Thinking Hats problem-solving process far more effectively.


Edward de Bono Discusses The Six Thinking Hats


Concluding Thoughts

The Six Thinking Hat’s problem-solving method provides us with a multi-dimensional tool that can dramatically improve the effectiveness and efficiency of how we think and work through problems. However, its use goes well beyond just problem-solving.

Whether your objective is to solve a problem, to overcome an obstacle, to brainstorm a new idea, to improve your decision-making or for academic purposes, the Six Thinking Hats will help you find the solutions, answers, and the opportunities you need to keep you ahead of the game.

Now the choice is yours. You can either just leave your hats hanging on the coat-hanger collecting dust, or you can consistently and persistently use them to improve the quality of your life.


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Six Thinking Hats Problem Solving Model


Adam is a life coach, mind mapper, doodler and visual thinker. He founded IQ Matrix in 2009 and has created over 350 self-growth mind maps. He also has a Free 40 Day How to Doodle Course where he teaches how to doodle using simple daily lessons. Read more about Adam’s story, and how he created the concept for IQ Matrix. Feel free to also get in touch and send Adam a message here.